Anonymous said: these anons are like, "can i be racist in the rain? can i be racist on a train? can i be racist in a box? can i be racist with a fox?"

boygeorgemichaelbluth:

locksandglasses:

lackadaisicallexicon:

thesoftghetto:

surrealexperiences:

cyb3ranthy:

incogneeco:

whiteoppression:

famphic:

anthotny:

postracialcomments:

lmfaoooooooooooooo Yes!

Lmao!
How can I be racist if I work with blacks
How can I be racist if one sold me slacks
I’m not racist I’m just like you. I’m best friends with a black or two.

i’m not racist, you see, it’s just a preference
i love eastern culture and its women’s deference
the west lost its way with no room for clemency
If I love Asian women, how’s that white supremacy?

i’m not a racist, i can’t be, you see
my great grandma’s grandma was part cherokee
plus one time i got called “cracker” to my face
don’t we all bleed red? i don’t even see race…

I’m not racist, blacks just need to stop complaining
Living in the past and white people blaming
I work hard, no handouts for every little fraction
If white privilege isn’t fair, then how is affirmative action?

I’m not racist man, I’m just right-wing
Plus reverse-racism is totally a thing
It’s not about power check the definition
Slavery wasn’t an evil thing, just asset acquisition.

How come I can’t say “nigga”, it just means brotha!
And ain’t I a brotha from anotha motha?
I didn’t use the ‘er’- so its a total difference.
You blacks give good white people such hindrance :(

'We can't handle spicy foods' ? Your jokes make me sad

See, if I joked and called you a “nigger”, you’ll be mad

You black people think we are always out here to ruin your day

Look, 'not all white people', …mmkay?

I can say “nigga” ‘cause of freedom of speech

And y’all always forget what MLK preached!

White privilege ain’t real ‘cause my life is hard

If you want to stop racists, don’t play the race card

Blacks can oppress. Shoot, they’ve oppressed me

I was the only white kid and the blacks were so mean

So I called one a nigger, but clicked anon first

yeah racism is real, but like… I’ve had it worst.

this the best post ever

romansva:

" Unreal Estate " by Tim Doyle

(via bethanyymaee)

Tags: omg

londonpalestineaction:

On the back of a further Block The Boat success with Vancouver also turning away a Zim ship at least once, here’s some guidance from our American allies in the struggle from the Free Palestine Movement. Obviously some is US-centric (e.g. the laws around pickets) but still some useful learnings in there!
A handbook for blocking ships
Following are some suggestions for actions of this type, based on our experience thus far.  No doubt others can offer more, so as to expand the group knowledge.  We are not including information of a confidential nature, but only that which the police and port management can reasonably be expected to anticipate.
1.  Points of blockage.
Until now, no group has tried to prevent a ship from docking at the port, nor does this seems likely.  The gates to the berths, through which there is entrance and egress seem to be the best points, with the intention of closing access for the workers.  Sometimes/often a berth is accessible from a neighboring berth although it may be forbidden to use such access in normal circumstances.  Leave no stone unturned.
2.  The workers.
There is no more important relationship than with the workers.  Intelligence from inside, and especially real time intelligence, from workers and other personnel, whether they are working the ship or doing another job, is immensely valuable.  If possible have off duty or former workers on the picket line.  They can provide invaluable advice and information.
The workers also have the most to lose.  Always remember that they are losing wages by not working.  Many probably have no opinion about our issue and are often forbidden by contract from acting on such opinion in any case.  However, they can refuse to work when the work site is in turmoil.  This is usually determined by a union arbiter when the workers are under contract.  Otherwise, it is sometimes left to the individual worker.
Workers may not have a position on our issue, but many are strongly averse to crossing a picket line.  Furthermore, if they are in contract negotiations or are dissatisfied with management, they may welcome a legitimate excuse to cooperate with a port slowdown.  Some picketers have suggested doing some fundraising to try to help offset the loss of wages, and to volunteer to help with worker issues.
Learn to recognize who is a worker and who is management or other staff.  This is usually by means of a union sticker on the car, which can be circulated to the picketers.  No one should cross a picket line, but this applies more to workers than to other personnel.
3.  Communication.
We have nothing to offer beyond the obvious.  A text alert system is an excellent way to mobilize volunteers on short notice, but you can be sure that the Israeli/Zionist hasbara trolls will sign up, as well as the police.  The usual social media are also extremely useful, especially if information is being dissimulated regularly.  Our reports, information and narrative need to grab as much of the public attention as possible.  It is good to cultivate press contacts and issue press reports, but the local MSM will be there anyway, if the story is even modestly compelling.
4.  The picket.
Obviously, numbers of picketers are paramount.  No need to tell you how to form alliances.  Although the actions are local, ask your contacts across the country and across the word and especially in Palestine to push whomever they know to participate.  Provide shuttles and transportation where possible.  Parking is often not permitted in the port area, so shuttles can be important.
Bicycles are also extremely valuable.  They can monitor all the gates and coordinate activity.  They can also be walked on the picket line, taking up space and making the line look bigger.  The same is true of signs, banners and flags, when the pickets are few.  Bullhorns also magnify the presence and are good for group communication.
The picket needs to be loud and boisterous, especially when workers and their cars approach.  The purpose is to give a good reason not to cross the picket line.  However, if workers defy the line, we have to accept their choice.  It is not for us to put ourselves in their position.  You may wish to consider flyers for both the workers and the picketers.  Music and a live band are a great help.  Food and water is helpful, but many of us find it preferable to fast on the line so that less water is needed and there is less need to access toilet facilities, which may be distant.  Wear a hat and avoid overheating.
It is good to have a few people, and especially off duty or former workers, to try to talk to the workers in their cars as they approach.  Cheer loudly and yell “Thank you” when they drive away.
5.  The police.
the police are generally permitted to lie and use force to achieve their objective, but the public (us) also has rights.  It is a big advantage to have legal counsel present.  Photo documentation can also be important, both for evidence and publication.
Our experience is that we we be allowed to express free speech rights in public areas and that the officers may try to clear a path for vehicles to enter and exit.  Obviously, we have no objection to exiting, but it is our understanding that the police have the right to clear an entrance path.  Our job is to convince the workers not to use the path.
Often, the presence of the police is itself a deterrent to workers.  Remember that workers also sometimes find themselves on the picket line.  If they see a huge number of the police personnel in formation at a gate, they might actually be less inclined to enter. This can be encouraged by testing the limits. Sometimes some of the uniformed officers will be kept in vehicles and pulled out only as needed. Larger numbers are needed to form a path for vehicles when picketers are blocking the way.
These suggestions are just a start and by no means exhaustive.  Others will undoubtedly add plenty of additional advice. Hopefully, the fact that a handbook is even motivated is an indication that this historic movement is just beginning to sweep the nation and the world.

londonpalestineaction:

On the back of a further Block The Boat success with Vancouver also turning away a Zim ship at least once, here’s some guidance from our American allies in the struggle from the Free Palestine Movement. Obviously some is US-centric (e.g. the laws around pickets) but still some useful learnings in there!

A handbook for blocking ships

Following are some suggestions for actions of this type, based on our experience thus far.  No doubt others can offer more, so as to expand the group knowledge.  We are not including information of a confidential nature, but only that which the police and port management can reasonably be expected to anticipate.

1.  Points of blockage.

Until now, no group has tried to prevent a ship from docking at the port, nor does this seems likely.  The gates to the berths, through which there is entrance and egress seem to be the best points, with the intention of closing access for the workers.  Sometimes/often a berth is accessible from a neighboring berth although it may be forbidden to use such access in normal circumstances.  Leave no stone unturned.

2.  The workers.

There is no more important relationship than with the workers.  Intelligence from inside, and especially real time intelligence, from workers and other personnel, whether they are working the ship or doing another job, is immensely valuable.  If possible have off duty or former workers on the picket line.  They can provide invaluable advice and information.

The workers also have the most to lose.  Always remember that they are losing wages by not working.  Many probably have no opinion about our issue and are often forbidden by contract from acting on such opinion in any case.  However, they can refuse to work when the work site is in turmoil.  This is usually determined by a union arbiter when the workers are under contract.  Otherwise, it is sometimes left to the individual worker.

Workers may not have a position on our issue, but many are strongly averse to crossing a picket line.  Furthermore, if they are in contract negotiations or are dissatisfied with management, they may welcome a legitimate excuse to cooperate with a port slowdown.  Some picketers have suggested doing some fundraising to try to help offset the loss of wages, and to volunteer to help with worker issues.

Learn to recognize who is a worker and who is management or other staff.  This is usually by means of a union sticker on the car, which can be circulated to the picketers.  No one should cross a picket line, but this applies more to workers than to other personnel.

3.  Communication.

We have nothing to offer beyond the obvious.  A text alert system is an excellent way to mobilize volunteers on short notice, but you can be sure that the Israeli/Zionist hasbara trolls will sign up, as well as the police.  The usual social media are also extremely useful, especially if information is being dissimulated regularly.  Our reports, information and narrative need to grab as much of the public attention as possible.  It is good to cultivate press contacts and issue press reports, but the local MSM will be there anyway, if the story is even modestly compelling.

4.  The picket.

Obviously, numbers of picketers are paramount.  No need to tell you how to form alliances.  Although the actions are local, ask your contacts across the country and across the word and especially in Palestine to push whomever they know to participate.  Provide shuttles and transportation where possible.  Parking is often not permitted in the port area, so shuttles can be important.

Bicycles are also extremely valuable.  They can monitor all the gates and coordinate activity.  They can also be walked on the picket line, taking up space and making the line look bigger.  The same is true of signs, banners and flags, when the pickets are few.  Bullhorns also magnify the presence and are good for group communication.

The picket needs to be loud and boisterous, especially when workers and their cars approach.  The purpose is to give a good reason not to cross the picket line.  However, if workers defy the line, we have to accept their choice.  It is not for us to put ourselves in their position.  You may wish to consider flyers for both the workers and the picketers.  Music and a live band are a great help.  Food and water is helpful, but many of us find it preferable to fast on the line so that less water is needed and there is less need to access toilet facilities, which may be distant.  Wear a hat and avoid overheating.

It is good to have a few people, and especially off duty or former workers, to try to talk to the workers in their cars as they approach.  Cheer loudly and yell “Thank you” when they drive away.

5.  The police.

the police are generally permitted to lie and use force to achieve their objective, but the public (us) also has rights.  It is a big advantage to have legal counsel present.  Photo documentation can also be important, both for evidence and publication.

Our experience is that we we be allowed to express free speech rights in public areas and that the officers may try to clear a path for vehicles to enter and exit.  Obviously, we have no objection to exiting, but it is our understanding that the police have the right to clear an entrance path.  Our job is to convince the workers not to use the path.

Often, the presence of the police is itself a deterrent to workers.  Remember that workers also sometimes find themselves on the picket line.  If they see a huge number of the police personnel in formation at a gate, they might actually be less inclined to enter. This can be encouraged by testing the limits. Sometimes some of the uniformed officers will be kept in vehicles and pulled out only as needed. Larger numbers are needed to form a path for vehicles when picketers are blocking the way.

These suggestions are just a start and by no means exhaustive.  Others will undoubtedly add plenty of additional advice. Hopefully, the fact that a handbook is even motivated is an indication that this historic movement is just beginning to sweep the nation and the world.

Anonymous said: I don't have a problem w/strippers and if u wanna sell ur body to gross men that's ur choice BUT pole dancing isn't stripping, pole takes ATHLETIC SKILL, im not just shakin my ass n picking up two-dollar bills w/my vagina. just because I pole dance 4 fitness and 2 express myself creatively doesn't mean i want ppl to assume i'm a trashy bimbo w/daddy issues.

clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead:

clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead:

Wow! You packed so much in here.

First of all, I’m not selling my body to gross old men.

There’s a few misconceptions in that one sentence alone. You may have noticed I’m home in my bathrobe, alone with my dogs, having finished my gyro, answering this. How did I get my body back?! Did I buy it back? Doesn’t that defeat the purpose of selling it? Maybe he GAVE it back to me out of charity when he was done using it, is that it?

So —taking this ask at face value—i’m gonna say your feminist praxis needs a bit of a refresher. Women—all women, and tbh all people as little as I care for men—are living beings with agency and calculating capabilities. We calculate our best options and go from there. We are not tissues to be used, regardless of that fervid and foetid radfem rhetoric. They only regard certain women as people anyway.

And then, if you’re talking to me, you know my stance on pole dancing. You know that western appropriation narratives aside, the reason you want pole dance specifically to be your fitness routine and not mallakhamb (which doesn’t welcome women anyway) or aerialism, is that neither have been sexy and appealing background props setting the standards of female desirability for the past twenty years.

Strippers have.

You want to look like a stripper. You want that slumming, dangerous, mysterious aura, you want to walk with confidence like I walk in 8” heels, you want to look like men pay you hundreds of dollars because you’re desirable.

You want to feel edgy and desirable.

That’s why you haven’t run off to cirque du soleil, nor are you calling aerialists tramps.

With that cleared up, let’s go back to your first point:

You do have a problem with strippers. Your problem: you want our aura and desirability and not the stigma, not the danger, not the real threat of losing homes/jobs/family/scholarships/children/careers/futures.

You know that the edginess you crave comes at a price, and your way of dealing with this is NOT to combat stripper stigma, your way of dealing with this is to play up respectability politics for all you’re worth, widening the dichotomy between pure you and filthy us, too busy selling our bodies to dirty old men to develop the skills and grace you so admire.

And to a certain degree this makes sense. It will work for you, sort of. There are people who will buy it, mostly other women who have the same investment in maintaining respectability politics.

Men, babe, are never going to believe you, and they are never going to care.

BUT! There’s another option. Instead of crying when someone asks if you’re a stripper after a certain effortfull routine, sobbing like strippers can’t climb a pole through shoulder mounts backward and then do a drop in a straddle split catching themselves an inch above the floor in 8” heels, instead of reassuring yourself that we’re all mushy muscles barely able to stagger around the pole, making your tricks all the more unique and special—

The next time someone asks if you’re a stripper you could say:

No! But isn’t it amazing that they manage to do this in heels?

No, I’m not a stripper, but I’m flattered you think I have that self confidence!

No, I’m not a stripper but I’ve thought about it, but the stigma scares me.

No, I’m not a stripper but their skills and bravery inspire me and my classmates!

No, I’m not a stripper, and it makes me nervous that you would ask that bc sex work is so loaded and sex workers are murdered and discriminated against, so I get defensive about this but I’m trying to fight it and support strippers in ending sex worker stigma, starting with myself.

No, I’m not a stripper and I get tense about that question because of daddy issues stereotypes but isn’t it so fucked up that strippers (and other women) are the butt of jokes about male pattern abuse? 1 in 3 or 4 women is abused in her life time, usually by a family member or an intimate partner. You know someone who is the butt of that joke, stripper or not. And issues are a valid response to abuse across the spectrum, not just for strippers.

No, I’m not a stripper but I love them and I’m jealous they get to wear fancy outfits.

No, I’m not a stripper because they’re an exploited labour class and i enjoy my pole work best without having to give a percent of my income to a man who doesn’t deserve it.

No, I’m not a stripper, and they don’t pick up dollars with their vaginas either because unlike customers (who stick dollars in their mouths) none of us are interested in getting hepatitis.

So these are some potential answers for you! Hope this helps and thanks for indulging me.

Love, your friend,

Red💋

image

returnofthejudai:

londonpalestineaction:

Sainsbury’s can’t tell the difference between antisemitism and anti-apartheid: an open letter
On Saturday 16 July, the manager of a Sainsbury’s store in Holborn apparently removed kosher products, many of which were not made in Israel, from their shelves. Whether they did this because of a supposed support for Palestinians, or because of an unfounded fear of violence from protesters, is unclear.
What is clear is this: Palestinian civil society did not ask for a boycott of kosher food. Only antisemites would want or support that. The call has always been explicitly and openly about boycotting Israeli-made goods, along with other tactics, until Israel complies with international law (which it currently ignores).
These tactics worked against apartheid South Africa, and they’re starting to work against apartheid Israel too.
The way forward is simple. Sainsbury’s cannot morally profit from or work with companies like Mehadrin and EDOM that steal Palestinian land and support the siege on Gaza.
Sainsbury’s knows all of this. The flyers given out at numerous Sainsbury’s stores across the country are unequivocal. The website specifically targeting Sainsbury’s trade with complicit Israeli companies is unambiguous.
We have sent files to Sainsbury’s management making it clear how their policies are harming Palestinian people, and have taken these to the last two Sainsbury’s AGMs. Individuals have asked for meetings to work on how this harm can stop, but the offers have been repeatedly ignored.
Sainsbury’s: if you can’t tell the difference between a boycott aimed at ending the occupation of Palestinian lands, and stopping Jewish people being able to buy kosher food in the UK, then you really need our help.
Signed by, amongst others:
London Palestine Action
Annie O’Gara Sainsbury’s Campaign
Michael Deas, coordinator in Europe, Palestinian BDS National Committee
Diana Neslen, Stop G4S
Hilary Lang, Frome Friends of Palestine
Pamela Manning, Cambridge Palestine Solidarity Campaign
Shoomi Chowdhury, Ipswich and Suffolk Muslim Council
Global Citizens (GC)
Grass Roots Muslim Movement
Angus Geddes, Portsmouth & South Downs Palestine Solidarity Campaign
Caroline Day, Tower Hamlets Jenin Friendship Association
Richard Hering - visionOntv
Sue Owen, Chesterfield Pro-peace/PSC
Naeem Malik West Midlands Palestine Solidarity Campaign 
Dr. Sue Blackwell (Sainsbury’s shareholder)
brighton and Hove PSC
Revolutionary Socialism in the 21st Century (rs21.org.uk)
Azfar Shafi, University of Birmingham Students for Justice in Palestine society
Dr mohamed Ali, NHS
Paddy O’Keeffe, Brighton Stop the War
Ben Maloney - Secretary, Enfield Southgate Labour Party
Tim Holmes, Public Interest Research Centre
Igor Strapko, Clapton Ultras
Rachel O’Brien, Community Action Officer at University of Birmingham Guild of Students
John Tymon, Football Against Apartheid
Loading…


Thank you for helping to draw that distinction so clearly and for getting so much support in doing so. I strongly believe that the fight for the rights and lives of Palestinians does not have to be anti-semitic. Your efforts here are making that case through your voices and actions.

returnofthejudai:

londonpalestineaction:

Sainsbury’s can’t tell the difference between antisemitism and anti-apartheid: an open letter

On Saturday 16 July, the manager of a Sainsbury’s store in Holborn apparently removed kosher products, many of which were not made in Israel, from their shelves. Whether they did this because of a supposed support for Palestinians, or because of an unfounded fear of violence from protesters, is unclear.

What is clear is this: Palestinian civil society did not ask for a boycott of kosher food. Only antisemites would want or support that. The call has always been explicitly and openly about boycotting Israeli-made goods, along with other tactics, until Israel complies with international law (which it currently ignores).

These tactics worked against apartheid South Africa, and they’re starting to work against apartheid Israel too.

The way forward is simple. Sainsbury’s cannot morally profit from or work with companies like Mehadrin and EDOM that steal Palestinian land and support the siege on Gaza.

Sainsbury’s knows all of this. The flyers given out at numerous Sainsbury’s stores across the country are unequivocal. The website specifically targeting Sainsbury’s trade with complicit Israeli companies is unambiguous.

We have sent files to Sainsbury’s management making it clear how their policies are harming Palestinian people, and have taken these to the last two Sainsbury’s AGMs. Individuals have asked for meetings to work on how this harm can stop, but the offers have been repeatedly ignored.

Sainsbury’s: if you can’t tell the difference between a boycott aimed at ending the occupation of Palestinian lands, and stopping Jewish people being able to buy kosher food in the UK, then you really need our help.

Signed by, amongst others:

  • London Palestine Action
  • Annie O’Gara Sainsbury’s Campaign
  • Michael Deas, coordinator in Europe, Palestinian BDS National Committee
  • Diana Neslen, Stop G4S
  • Hilary Lang, Frome Friends of Palestine
  • Pamela Manning, Cambridge Palestine Solidarity Campaign
  • Shoomi Chowdhury, Ipswich and Suffolk Muslim Council
  • Global Citizens (GC)
  • Grass Roots Muslim Movement
  • Angus Geddes, Portsmouth & South Downs Palestine Solidarity Campaign
  • Caroline Day, Tower Hamlets Jenin Friendship Association
  • Richard Hering - visionOntv
  • Sue Owen, Chesterfield Pro-peace/PSC
  • Naeem Malik West Midlands Palestine Solidarity Campaign 
  • Dr. Sue Blackwell (Sainsbury’s shareholder)
  • brighton and Hove PSC
  • Revolutionary Socialism in the 21st Century (rs21.org.uk)
  • Azfar Shafi, University of Birmingham Students for Justice in Palestine society
  • Dr mohamed Ali, NHS
  • Paddy O’Keeffe, Brighton Stop the War
  • Ben Maloney - Secretary, Enfield Southgate Labour Party
  • Tim Holmes, Public Interest Research Centre
  • Igor Strapko, Clapton Ultras
  • Rachel O’Brien, Community Action Officer at University of Birmingham Guild of Students
  • John Tymon, Football Against Apartheid

Thank you for helping to draw that distinction so clearly and for getting so much support in doing so. I strongly believe that the fight for the rights and lives of Palestinians does not have to be anti-semitic. Your efforts here are making that case through your voices and actions.

theculturedactivist:

Open your eyes.

Queer women need to stop fetishizing trans men. We’re not your nice guys.

rainbowcuntboyfeelingsandshit:

There’s a growing problem in the queer community right now of women identifying folk fetishizing trans men not only sexually but also as the better kind of man compared to cis men.

I don’t claim to talk for all trans men everywhere, and I’m open to the idea that I’m completely wrong about this, but it’s a problem I’ve seen and personally experienced within the community and I think it bares discussion.

Let’s talk about the sexual aspect first; queer women love fetishizing trans men. It’s no secret in the community. Pretty much every trans man I’ve ever met who’s involved in the queer community can identify that. From what I can understand this is because we’re seen as the ultimate butches. I once had an annoying encounter with a drag queen who asserted that all trans men are lesbians, like once you hit the max level of being a lesbian you just decide to become a man.

Read More

this comes up every now and again (e.g. for the AFem2014 conference in London, remember?)

I think it’s to the credit of trans men/trans masculine ppl that they so frequently remind people how problematic they can be ;)

"But Hamas…"

In conversations about Gaza, I have heard many thoughtful people in the Jewish community lament the loss of Palestinian lives in Gaza but then say, “But Hamas…,” as if that were the heart of the problem. I’d like to suggest that, when we have these conversations about Hamas and Israel’s current bombing campaign, we begin with the necessary context and historical perspective.

Re: The Nakba

1. To create the Jewish state, the Zionist movement destroyed more than 400 Palestinians villages and expelled 700,000 Palestinians from their homes and land. Palestinians who remained in what became Israel were relegated to second-class citizenship, had much of their property confiscated, and, to this day, have fewer rights than Jewish Israeli citizens.

Re: The 1967 Occupation

2. In 1967, Israel occupied the West Bank, Gaza, and East Jerusalem and still occupies them until this day.

Re: Settlement expansion; the apartheid wall; and the siege of Gaza

3. Over the past 47 years of occupation, Israel has illegally confiscated more and more Palestinian land; built an apartheid wall; systematically denied Palestinians basic human and civil rights and engaged in state-sponsored violence; and forced the Palestinians in Gaza to live in appalling conditions that make it increasingly impossible to survive. Israel’s latest bombing campaign, Operation Protective Edge, has killed over 1,900 Palestinians, at least 450 of whom are children, and has displaced hundreds of thousands more.

If those of us in the Jewish community who are committed to justice begin from these facts, I think it would become clearer – regardless of who the Palestinian leadership is – that the underlying problem really is the denial of freedom and basic human rights to millions of people, for decades. And, as a community, it should also become clearer where priorities need to be in order to have any integrity on this issue: addressing the Nakba of 1948 and the responsibility for the Nakba head-on – including the right of return for refugees; ending the occupation; ending the siege on Gaza; and recognizing the right to full equality for Palestinian citizens of Israel.

— Donna Nevel

(via standwithpalestine)

catsvspatriarchy:

Sometimes I’m reading through the various support blogs for non binary and binary trans people that I follow, and I end up thinking to myself ‘Wow, are all these people transgender?’ It seems almost hard to believe

And then I remember that this is the point: society likes to erase us and pretend we don’t exist, so a great many of us grow up never even considering that we might be transgender and we think (like everyone else) that there are very few trans people in the world. But Tumblr’s been great in reminding me that for thousands of people being trans is a reality and their everyday experience.

This is why I get very defensive when people bash Tumblr, because it is good and great and awesome.