• Iran has no nuclear weapons.
  • Since 2007, US intelligence has thought that Iran hasn’t got a programme to develop nuclear weapons.
  • The IAEA does not assert that Iran has an ongoing nuclear weapons programme.
  • Iran doesn’t breach the Non-Proliferation Treaty - it’s acting just like Brazil is.
  • Iran’s nuclear facilities are open to IAEA inspection, but those of Israel and India (allies of the United States) are almost entirely closed to the IAEA. Iran faces ferocious sanctions and threats of military action; Israel (with perhaps as many as 400 nuclear bombs, and the capacity to deliver them anywhere in the Middle East) is the object of more than $3 billion a year of US military aid.
  • Iran never threatened to “wipe Israel off the map”.

Really amazing article on Iran, and how similar the media climate is to pre-Iraq’s “cheerleader for war” shitstorm.

Drops a ton of truth bombs about the USA’s influence on the IAEA, repeated misleading by world leaders about the issue, and more.

Boom.

Men in Iran don women’s clothes to protest cross-dress punishment
 Over the last week, over 150 Kurdish men have posted photographs of themselves in women’s clothing to campaign against the sexist nature of a court sentence which led to the public humiliation of a man by dressing him in women’s clothing.
Since the Kurd Men for Equality campaign has been launched on 18 April, it has quickly gained an international following of over 7,000 fans. Over 150 men have submitted photographs of themselves in women’s clothing to emphasize the message that being a woman should not be considered humiliating.
Read more

Men in Iran don women’s clothes to protest cross-dress punishment

 Over the last week, over 150 Kurdish men have posted photographs of themselves in women’s clothing to campaign against the sexist nature of a court sentence which led to the public humiliation of a man by dressing him in women’s clothing.

Since the Kurd Men for Equality campaign has been launched on 18 April, it has quickly gained an international following of over 7,000 fans. Over 150 men have submitted photographs of themselves in women’s clothing to emphasize the message that being a woman should not be considered humiliating.

Read more

stay-human:

Whut.

…whut

stay-human:

Whut.

…whut

citoyenrebelle:

mohandasgandhi:

eltigrechico:

sexdrugsrockpaperscissors:

thevocalibertarian:

thedailyconservative:

DOES THIS NOT CONCERN ANYBODY!? -Areas that Iran can attack with missile- 

We should make a map of places the US could attack with unmanned drones. Oh wait…

here I found one already made


Let’s have some real fun!
Here is a photo of the U.S. Bases around Iran


And here is a (partial) list of places the U.S. has bombed (in red)


Now, here is a picture of the places Iran has bombed


BUT BUT BUT IRAN IS SCARY, GUYS.


That Average Iranian Living Room of Terror art just killed me. Nooo another victim~

best

citoyenrebelle:

mohandasgandhi:

eltigrechico:

sexdrugsrockpaperscissors:

thevocalibertarian:

thedailyconservative:

DOES THIS NOT CONCERN ANYBODY!? 

-Areas that Iran can attack with missile- 

We should make a map of places the US could attack with unmanned drones. Oh wait…

here I found one already made

Let’s have some real fun!

Here is a photo of the U.S. Bases around Iran


And here is a (partial) list of places the U.S. has bombed (in red)


Now, here is a picture of the places Iran has bombed

BUT BUT BUT IRAN IS SCARY, GUYS.

That Average Iranian Living Room of Terror art just killed me. Nooo another victim~

best

(via apocalypse-revolutionnaire)

46% say that Israel should not attack Tehran’s nuclear plants; support for prime minister drops to 34% from 46% three months ago

The majority of Israelis oppose a strike on Iran’s nuclear facilities in order to halt its nuclear drive, Channel 10 reported on Sunday.

A poll conducted by the Dialogue Institute under the supervision of Dr. Kamil Fuchs found that 46 percent of respondents said that Israel should not attack Iran’s nuclear facilities, 32% advocated an Israeli strike, and 22% offered no opinion.

The survey results were published amid heightened debate among senior policy officials about the necessity of a military strike to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Defense Minister Ehud Barak have made increasingly vociferous statements about the urgent imperative to stop Iran.

The poll also showed that Israeli support for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has waned in the past three months. According to the poll, only 34% expressed satisfaction with the prime minister, as opposed to 58% who said that they are dissatisfied. The remaining 8% responded that they did not know. A similar survey conducted in May found that 46% were satisfied with the prime minister’s performance.

The same survey found Israelis prefer Mitt Romney to Barack Obama as the next US president, by 34% to 31%.

Channel 10 attributed the prime minister’s decreased support to the public’s perception that he has failed to stand up against the ultra-Orthodox regarding a universal military draft, which many secular Israelis as well as those in the national-religious camp strongly support.

On Sunday evening, some 200 people gathered at the home of Defense Minister Ehud Barak to protest a possible strike against Iran. The protest was organized by award-winning Israeli filmmaker Doron Tzabari. A press release publicizing the rally was sent out on Sunday afternoon by Tel Aviv city councilwoman Tamar Zandberg.

One of the protesters held aloft a sign depicting Barak wearing a Nazi uniform, Ynet reported. Fellow protesters forced him to take down the sign immediately, shouting “There will be no swastikas here!”

The man was subsequently detained by police and removed from the rally.

(Source: akio, via sinidentidades)

not as politicised as it makes it sounds, they’ve also declined aid from everywhere as the Red Crescent in Iran says they can handle it internally and don’t need international support

the petitions that I’ve seen on Twitter from US-based activists demanding that Obama grants a licence to give on aid seem to be entirely separate from any reality including Iranian opinion. none of them seem to want to checkwhatIranian groups/individuals are asking for

who’s surprised?

What’s going on in Israel?

verbalresistance:

What’s going on in Israel?

One of the more enduring myths in the perennial debate on the Israel-Palestine conflict is the claim that Israel has always been interested in a fair and just peace, and that the only thing standing in the way of a deal is the Palestinians’ commitment to Israel’s destruction. This notion has been endlessly recycled by Israeli diplomats and by Israel’s defenders in the United States and elsewhere.

Of course, fair-minded analysts of the conflict have long known that this pernicious narrative was bogus. They knew that former Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (who signed the Oslo Accords) never favored creating a viable Palestinian state (indeed, he explicitly said that a future Palestinian entity would be “less than a state.”)  The Palestinians’ errors notwithstanding, they also understood that Prime Minister Ehud Barak’s offers at Camp David in 2000 — though more generous than his predecessors’ — still fell well short of a genuine two-state deal. But the idea that Israel sought peace above all else but lacked a genuine “partner for peace” has remained an enduring “explanation” for Oslo’s failure.

Over the past several weeks, however, the veil has fallen off almost completely. If you want to understand what’s really going on, here are a few things you need to read.

Start with Akiva Eldar’s cover article in The National Interest, entitled "Israel’s New Politics and the Fate of Palestine." Eldar is the chief political columnist for the Israeli newspaper Ha’aretz,and his article provides a succinct account for why the two-state vision is at best on life support and is unlikely to be resuscitated. Money quotation:

"[T]he Palestinian leadership, as far back as 1988, made a strategic decision favoring the two-state solution, presented in the Algiers declaration of the Palestinian National Council. The Arab League, for its part, voted in favor of a peace initiative that would recognize the state of Israel and set the terms for a comprehensive Middle East settlement. Meanwhile, various bodies of the international community reasserted partition of the land as their formal policy. But Israel, which signed the Oslo accords nearly two decades ago, has been moving in a different direction.

Eldar goes on to describe in detail the demographic and political trends that have made the two-solution an increasingly remote prospect, undermining Israeli democracy in the process and leading to a deepening policy of “separation.” Eldar avoids the politically loaded term apartheid, but here is how he describes the current reality:

"To exercise control over the land without giving up its Jewish identity, Israel has embraced various policies of "separation." It has separate legal systems for traditional Israeli territory and for the territory it occupies; it divides those who reside in occupied lands based on ethnic identity; it has retained control over occupied lands but evaded responsibility for the people living there; and it has created a conceptual distinction between its democratic principles and its actual practices in the occupied territories. These separations have allowed Israel to manage the occupation for forty-five years while maintaining its identity and international status. No other state in the twenty-first century has been able to get away with this, but it works for Israel, which has little incentive to change it.

It works, of course, because the Israel lobby makes it virtually impossible for U.S. leaders to put any meaningful pressure on Israel to change its behavior, much of which is now antithetical to core American values.

To grasp what Eldar is talking about, check out former Netanyahu aide Michael Freund’s June 20 column from the Jerusalem Post, entitled "Kiss the Green Line Goodbye."  Unlike Eldar’s requiem for the end of the two-state vision, Freund’s column is a proud declaration that the settlement project has succeeded in making “greater Israel” a permanent reality.  In his words “the Green Line (the 1967 borders) is dead and buried… it is no longer of any relevance, politically or otherwise.” And he offers critics a piece of advice regarding "Judea and Samaria": "you had better get used to it, because the Jewish people are here to stay." This is not a wild-eyed assertion by some extremist settler, by the way, but a revealing glimpse at an increasingly mainstream view.

Next, to see the on-the-ground consequences of these developments, check out Nir Hasson’s piece on how residents of East Jerusalem (illegally annexed by Israel following the 1967 war) face increasingly erratic water supplies. Then give a listen or a read to NPR reporter Lourdes Garcia-Navarro’s report on how home demolitions in East Jerusalem have increased dramatically over the past year, with about 1100 people — half of them children — displaced. Israeli officials claim that this is merely an appropriate response to “illegal” construction, but as a recent U.N. report documents, over 90 percent of Palestinian applications for building permits are denied, even as Israel continues to build housing settlements for Jews in various east Jerusalem neighborhoods.

What is going on, in short, is slow-motion ethnic cleansing. Instead of driving Palestinians out by force — as was done in 1948 and 1967 — the goal is simply to make life increasingly untenable over time, so that they will gradually leave their ancestral homelands of their own accord.

Finally, make sure you read up on the recent Levy Commission report — excerpted here. (A good place to start is Matt Duss’s summary here.) This commission, appointed by Prime Minister Netanyahu, has concluded that Israel’s presence in the West Bank isn’t really an “occupation,” so the 4th Geneva Convention regarding protection of the local population doesn’t apply. It sees no legal barrier to Israel transferring as many of its citizens as it wants into the territory, and it therefore recommends that the government retroactively authorize dozens of illegal settlements. Never mind that no other country in the world — including the United States — agrees with this dubious legal interpretation, and neither does the United Nations or any other recognized juridical body outside Israel.  

Needless to say, anyone who has visited the West Bank and seen the "matrix of control" imposed there will quickly understand that the Commission’s members were smoking something, and even a staunch defender of Israel like Jeffrey Goldberg had problems with the commission’s Alice-in-Wonderland line of argument. A wide array of commentators (including the New York Timeseditorial board and former U.S. ambassador to Israel Daniel Kurtzer) have already denounced these claims, albeit in a typically qualified fashion. The Times’ expresses the hope that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will “drive U.S. concerns home” when she visits Israel this month. As if that’s going to do any good at this point.

The veil slipped a long time ago, and now it has been torn away almost completely. But once you grasp what’s really happening here, you have to completely rethink your views about who the real friends of Israel are and who are the ones threatening its future. Israel’s true friends may or may not be emotionally committed to it, but they are the ones who understand that the settlement enterprise has been a disaster and that only concerted and principled action by the United States, the EU, and others can avert this future train wreck. They are the ones who understand that it is Israel’s actions in Lebanon, in Gaza, in the West Bank, in Dubaiin Iran, etc. that are slowly squandering the legitimacy and support it once enjoyed, including support within the diaspora. When Israel ends up tied with North Korea (!) in a 2012 BBC survey on which countries have the “most negative” global influence (and ahead of only Iran and Pakistan), you know there’s a problem.  They are also among those who fear that Israel’s conduct and the smear tactics employed by some of its defenders have no place in American political life, and might eventually cost it the support it has long enjoyed here in the United States.  

By contrast, Israel’s loudest defenders (and those in the middle who are cowed by them) are the ones whose short-sighted focus has allowed the occupation to persist and deepen over time. Their unthinking loyalty has helped squander genuine opportunities for peace, empowered extremists on both sides, and prolonged a long and bitter conflict. The question to ask is simple: Where do they think this is headed? 

And the same principle applies to American interests and U.S. policy. Given the current “special relationship” between the U.S. and Israel, America’s standing in the region and in the world is inevitably tarnished as long as Israel persists on the course described in the articles cited above. This situation forces U.S. leaders to adopt contorted and hypocritical positions on human rights, non-proliferation, democracy promotion, and the legitimacy of military force. It makes U.S. leaders look impotent whenever they repeatedly term Israel’s actions “regrettable” or an “obstacle to peace” but then do nothing about them. It forces politicians of both parties to devote an inordinate amount of attention to one small country, to the neglect of many others. Worst of all, U.S. policy ends up undermining the reasonable people in Israel and the Arab world — including moderate Palestinians — those who are genuinely interested in a peaceful solution and to coexistence among the peoples of the region. Instead, we unwittingly aid the various extremists who gain power from the prolonged stalemate and the sowing of hatred. This bipartisan practice may not be the most dysfunctional policy in the history of U.S. foreign policy, but it’s got to be damned close.

A great summative analysis, on a lot of what’s going on right now on the Israeli/USA-Palestinian front… A must read.

It details how Israel is increasingly and more blatantly (by all international standards and indicators; to pretty much anyone, with an ounce of objective reason) playing a much wider political game, to ensure it gets what it wants - which is to say, the status quo.

The status quo suits them very well, as more and more people are now accepting. Talks of lacking a ‘partner for peace’ and other such lies from are but stalling tactics - as the occupation just grows in the background - with no one holding Israel accountable (as the US has shielded them from being held accountable, oh so very consistently throughout history).

Israel is fighting a losing battle over victimhood. The short-sighted Right wing fundamentalists at the helm of Israeli politics at the moment (and their henchmen in the US) are going down a path of self-destruction - almost consigning notions of a ‘peace process’ to history, in their blatant bias and indignant stances, ironically ‘in support of Israel’. They’re slowly putting to bed any ideas of a two state solution - as well as undermining US standing, in making it the complicit facilitator.

The current system, which is little but Apartheid, suits them - the current system, sugar-coat it how you will (and as the article above also details) is little but an ethnic cleansing of sorts. It’s erasing any hopes of a Palestinian state, denying Palestinians the right to self-determination and denying them basic human rights - as they live continuously under varying degrees of occupation, in increasingly smaller bantustans, with diminishing slithers of sovereignty.

As this brilliant article, on the anniversary of the (apparently “non existent”) occupation sums up -

The Israeli occupation of the West Bank is therefore a unique phenomenon. Between one-quarter and one half of the population under Israeli control (the exact number depends on how you estimate of the size of Palestinian population, and whether you count Gaza or not) does not enjoy the most basic of civil rights or any political representation within the regime that controls it. Israel is a decent democracy for its Jewish citizens. For Palestinians, it’s a brutal dictatorship.

… Today Israel builds roads, even new neighborhoods, commercial spaces and culture centers in the West Bank, while pushing the Palestinian population from those areas to the crowded cities and villages (a good graphic of the land allocation can be found here). Hundreds of “illegal” Palestinian homes are being destroyed every year, and no permits for new ones are given. This systematic displacement and confiscation has been taking place for almost half a century. The problem with the settlements is not the settlers. It’s the state.

In recent years, the occupation has reached its most sophisticated level. It is the greatest national project Israel has launched. The best and the brightest take part in it: the high-tech industry invents new means of control and supervision over the local population (the army has become so good at this job, that Israel has exported much of the knowledge it gained in the West Bank and Gaza to other occupying countries); the best legal scholars come up with loopholes to allow the ongoing confiscation of assets and deprivation of rights; and the most skilled diplomats are taking part in a propaganda war meant to convince the world that the Palestinians are to blame for the occupation.Astonishingly, the international community is buying this nonsense, treating what is basically a massive-scale human rights violation as if it was a remote border dispute between two sovereign nations …

Meetings between Israelis and Palestinians might look promising to an outsider, but they continue to feel awkward and staged, because the two sides are unequal, one possessing all the privileges and the other not having even basic human rights. The prisoners should not be expected to make friends with their guards, even if those are the nicest prisoners, and the best-intentioned of guards.

There is another, more fundamental problem: The status quo is good for Israelis and bad for Palestinians. I say that as an Israeli who wants to continue enjoying the great life this country can offer to (some of) its citizens. With both solutions – one state or two states – being so costly and dangerous, keeping things as they are seems like the best option for Israeli decision-makers. As long as the Israeli government has the power to maintain the status quo, it will …

Rightwing politicians here and in the United States are selling the public fantasies, as if it’s possible to keep the West Bank forever or give the Palestinian the right to vote for the Jordanian parliament or “an enhanced autonomy,” or other similar ideas which are just code names for Apartheid … [Whole]

All the farcical sabre-rattling over the non-existent “Iranian threat”, almost seems like a clever diversionary tactic from Israel… playing up to that ‘threatened and cornered victim in a sea of hostility’ persona they love to portray - falsely, as the very real and current crime, of occupation and apartheid, rumbles on in the background.

Really good overview post for Israel/Palestine shit

A BBC news story has revealed UK politicians are planning to offer diplomatic, possibly military, support to an Israeli attack against Iran, despite the fact this would break international law, inflame the Middle East and endanger British citizens everywhere.

pieceinthepuzzlehumanity:

Millions of Internet users in Iran could soon be permanently cut off from the Web, social networks, and e-mail.

In a statement released last week, Reza Taghipour, the Iranian minister for Information and Communications Technology, announced it plans to establish a national intranet within five months in an effort to create a “clean Internet,” according to an International Business Times report. “All Internet Service Providers (ISP) should only present National Internet by August,” Taghipour said in the statement.

Web sites such as Google, Hotmail, and Yahoo will be blocked and replaced by government-administered services such as like Iran Mail and Iran Search Engine, according to the report. The government has already begun a registration process for those interested in using the Iran Mail that will verify and record user’s full name and address.

[Read More]

(via themindislimitless)

This is even more ridiculous than the normal story about the US funding and training terrorist cells.

According to a “new, multi-sourced report from The New Yorker‘s Seymour Hersh”, the Bush administration trained the Iranian dissident group Mujahideen-e-Khalq (MEK).

The MEK are the group that’s probably behind the recent assassinations of Iranian scientists. They’re also being funded and trained by Israeli intelligence agencies.

Just… ugh.