Human Rights Watch says the men were charged with “lewd or unnatural acts with an individual of the same sex”. Ugh.

"In UN parlance, Western Sahara is officially a non-self-governing territory. This makes it Africa’s last remaining colony, and no other country in the world recognises Morocco’s sovereignty.

Any call for Saharawi independence is considered a crime against the integrity of the Moroccan state, as is showing the Saharawi flag in public. This did not stop several people proudly displaying it to us throughout our visit, as a sign of their refusal to bow to Moroccan military rule.

As Europeans, we are also complicit in the dispossession of Saharawi resources. Last December our representatives in the European parliament signed us up to a new fisheries agreement with Morocco that allows European boats to fish in Saharawi waters in return for a healthy fee to the Moroccan authorities."

Western Sahara activists feel full force of Moroccan intimidation

The EU plans to sign a deal to fish off the coast of Western Sahara, a country under military occupation by Morocco since 1975. The Saharawi people that live in Western Sahara are fighting the plan, and this is Morocco’s response.

Bludgeoning protesters with both uniforms and plain-clothed police. Kicking old men to the ground.

Fuck EU plundering! See more videos of the repression.

kropotkitten:

maptitude:

This is a endonym map - a map in which labels are written as they would be in the area being labeled. In other words, each country’s name is written in its native language. It’s a great representation of how our own maps are very tailored to our own use, in ways we don’t usually think about. You can see more of this map here.

ugh, i just noticed they got Ireland wrong…and that most of Africa’s countries are given French names…I don’t know much about the history of the Arabization of North Africa, but i wonder if those names are correct but using Arabic script? Needless to say, this map is pretty colonialist as far as the use of French and Portuguese names for African nations.
Something I can talk about: English is not the native language of Ireland, it was forced upon it by the colonizers, the British (sorry Scots friends, but your people took an active role in the colonization as well, owning plantations and such)
The native language of Ireland is Irish, in Irish Ireland has multiple names though in English it usually goes by the Republic of Ireland, to differentiate between Northern Ireland, which is still colonized by the British
Éire  the official name of Ireland according to the Constitution drafted when part of Ireland was finally free of English rule
Poblacht na hÉireann
the legal name of Ireland, in english: The Republic of Ireland.
and just for fun here is a bunch of ancient names the island was known as to its dwellers and to its neighbors
The Annals of the Four Masters describes how Ireland was referred to in ancient times[citation needed]
During the time of the Partholonians, Nemedians, Fomorians, and Firbolg, the island was given a number of names:[citation needed]Inis Ealga signifying the noble or excellent island. The Latin translation was Insula Nobilis
Fiodh-Inis signifying the Woody island. In Latin this was Insula nemorosa
Crioch Fuinidh signifying the Final or remote country. In Latin as Terra finalia.

Inisfail meaning the Island of Destiny, and Inisfalia or Insula Fatalis in Latin. This was the name used by the Tuatha Dé Danann and from this ‘Fál’ became an ancient name for Ireland. In this respect, therefore, Lia Fáil, the Stone of Destiny, came to mean ‘Stone of Ireland’. Inisfail appears as a synonym for Erin in some Irish romantic and nationalist poetry in English in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; Aubrey Thomas de Vere's 1863 poem Inisfail is an example.
Ériu (from which derived Éire), Banba and Fódla where names given by the Dananns from three of their queens.
‘Ierne’ refers to Ireland by various ancient Greek writers and many scholars have the opinion that in the poem when the Argonauts passes Neson Iernida, that is, the Island Iernis, they are referring to the island of Ireland, thus referring to Ireland longer ago than 1000 BC.
Insula Sacra or the “Sacred Isle” was how several Roman writers referred to the island on account of its being a celebrated seat of Druidism.
Ogygia meaning the most ancient land is a name used by Plutarch in the first century which may refer to Ireland.
Hibernia is first used to refer to Ireland by Julius Caesar in his account of Britain, and became a common term used by the Romans. They also used a number of other terms, namely Juverna, Juvernia, Ouvernia, Ibernia, Ierna, Vernia. Ptolemy also refers to it as Iouernia or Ivernia.
Scotia or the land of the Scots is a term used by various Roman and other Latin writers, who referred to Irish raiders as Scoti. Some of the earliest mentions are in the 5th century, St. Patrick calls the Irish “Scoti”, and in the 6th century, St. Isidore bishop of Seville and Gildas the British historian both refer to Ireland as Scotia. It was a term that exclusively referred to Ireland up until the eleventh century when modern Scotland was first referred to as Scotia. But even up until the sixteenth century, many Latin writers continued to refer to Ireland as Scotia. From the twelfth to the sixteenth century, various scholars used to distinguish between Ireland and Scotland by using Scotia Vetus or Scotia Major meaning Old Scotia or the Greater Scotia for Ireland, and Scotia Minor or Lesser Scotia for Scotland.
Insula Sanctorum or the Island of the Saints and Insula Docturum or the Island of the Learned are names used by various Latin writers; hence the modern-day quasi-poetic description of the island as the “Land of Saints and Scholars”.

The bolded ones are my personal favorites, I especially liked the three names of Ireland after the ancient queens

Yeah, interesting that they use Arabic for Morocco, but even worse that they include occupied Western Sahara as part of Morocco.
ffs, cartographers!

kropotkitten:

maptitude:

This is a endonym map - a map in which labels are written as they would be in the area being labeled. In other words, each country’s name is written in its native language. It’s a great representation of how our own maps are very tailored to our own use, in ways we don’t usually think about. You can see more of this map here.

ugh, i just noticed they got Ireland wrong…and that most of Africa’s countries are given French names…I don’t know much about the history of the Arabization of North Africa, but i wonder if those names are correct but using Arabic script? Needless to say, this map is pretty colonialist as far as the use of French and Portuguese names for African nations.

Something I can talk about: English is not the native language of Ireland, it was forced upon it by the colonizers, the British (sorry Scots friends, but your people took an active role in the colonization as well, owning plantations and such)

The native language of Ireland is Irish, in Irish Ireland has multiple names though in English it usually goes by the Republic of Ireland, to differentiate between Northern Ireland, which is still colonized by the British

Éire 
the official name of Ireland according to the Constitution drafted when part of Ireland was finally free of English rule

Poblacht na hÉireann


the legal name of Ireland, in english: The Republic of Ireland.

and just for fun here is a bunch of ancient names the island was known as to its dwellers and to its neighbors

The Annals of the Four Masters describes how Ireland was referred to in ancient times[citation needed]

  • During the time of the Partholonians, Nemedians, Fomorians, and Firbolg, the island was given a number of names:[citation needed]
    • Inis Ealga signifying the noble or excellent island. The Latin translation was Insula Nobilis
    • Fiodh-Inis signifying the Woody island. In Latin this was Insula nemorosa
    • Crioch Fuinidh signifying the Final or remote country. In Latin as Terra finalia.
  • Inisfail meaning the Island of Destiny, and Inisfalia or Insula Fatalis in Latin. This was the name used by the Tuatha Dé Danann and from this ‘Fál’ became an ancient name for Ireland. In this respect, therefore, Lia Fáil, the Stone of Destiny, came to mean ‘Stone of Ireland’. Inisfail appears as a synonym for Erin in some Irish romantic and nationalist poetry in English in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; Aubrey Thomas de Vere's 1863 poem Inisfail is an example.
  • Ériu (from which derived Éire), Banba and Fódla where names given by the Dananns from three of their queens.
  • Ierne’ refers to Ireland by various ancient Greek writers and many scholars have the opinion that in the poem when the Argonauts passes Neson Iernida, that is, the Island Iernis, they are referring to the island of Ireland, thus referring to Ireland longer ago than 1000 BC.
  • Insula Sacra or the “Sacred Isle” was how several Roman writers referred to the island on account of its being a celebrated seat of Druidism.
  • Ogygia meaning the most ancient land is a name used by Plutarch in the first century which may refer to Ireland.
  • Hibernia is first used to refer to Ireland by Julius Caesar in his account of Britain, and became a common term used by the Romans. They also used a number of other terms, namely Juverna, Juvernia, Ouvernia, Ibernia, Ierna, Vernia. Ptolemy also refers to it as Iouernia or Ivernia.
  • Scotia or the land of the Scots is a term used by various Roman and other Latin writers, who referred to Irish raiders as Scoti. Some of the earliest mentions are in the 5th century, St. Patrick calls the Irish “Scoti”, and in the 6th century, St. Isidore bishop of Seville and Gildas the British historian both refer to Ireland as Scotia. It was a term that exclusively referred to Ireland up until the eleventh century when modern Scotland was first referred to as Scotia. But even up until the sixteenth century, many Latin writers continued to refer to Ireland as Scotia. From the twelfth to the sixteenth century, various scholars used to distinguish between Ireland and Scotland by using Scotia Vetus or Scotia Major meaning Old Scotia or the Greater Scotia for Ireland, and Scotia Minor or Lesser Scotia for Scotland.
  • Insula Sanctorum or the Island of the Saints and Insula Docturum or the Island of the Learned are names used by various Latin writers; hence the modern-day quasi-poetic description of the island as the “Land of Saints and Scholars”.

The bolded ones are my personal favorites, I especially liked the three names of Ireland after the ancient queens

Yeah, interesting that they use Arabic for Morocco, but even worse that they include occupied Western Sahara as part of Morocco.

ffs, cartographers!

(Source: maptitude1)

Western Sahara: a potted history, and why Sahrawis are so pissed off

The world has changed in many ways in the past 50 years. Global population has doubled, and well over half of the people alive in the world today were born after the United Nations requested, in 1965, that Spain de-colonise the territory of Western Sahara, which it had occupied since the late 19th century. But Spain would not relinquish the last colonial country in Africa so readily, and for the next 7 years the request for Spain to organise a referendum to establish the will of the people with regard to the future of Western Sahara was an annual fixture on the UN agenda.

As Saharwi youth become increasingly frustrated with the status quo, some feel the time is right for a change, even breaking the truce, if the UN can’t get its act together and force a referendum in the very near future.

Read more

Fuck yeah Amazigh self-determination!

Interesting to go past discussions of the sovereignty referendum, and onto the less-discussed issues:

  • how Morocco uses “war on terror” narrative to fund oppression of the Western Sahara;
  • how the longest-running colonial conflict is basically unchallenged by other Arab countries;
  • how the Polisario Front is starting to be viewed like the Palestinian Authority (as benefiters from the occupation rather than warriors for its end)

The UN has been in the Western Sahara for ages now, but has never been given a mandate to monitor human rights abuses (mainly because it didn’t have enough money to).

This would be great!

The sentencing of 24 Saharawi activists by a Moroccan military tribunal last weekend is a travesty of justice. The defendants, most of whom received sentences ranging from 20 years to life imprisonment, were involved in setting-up the Gdeim Izik protest camp in Western Sahara in 2010, widely regarded as the first spark of the Arab spring. Amnesty International has described their trial as flawed from the outset, in violation of international standards for fair trials. While in detention, the defendants claim to have been coerced into signing confessions. Any trial of the defendants, many of whom are prominent human rights activists, should have been in a civilian court. It should not have been delayed by over two years and allegations of torture should have been fully and independently investigated. This appears to have been a politically motivated show trial. We urge the international community to speak out against these sentences and support our call for independent human rights monitoring in Western Sahara.

Javier Bardem supports jailed Western Sahara activists
Activists in London today took part in an international day of protest marking the second anniversary of the detention without trial of 23 Saharawis from Western Sahara.
They are demanding the immediate release of the prisoners who were arrested following the violent dismantling of the Gdeim Izik protest camp by Moroccan police in 2010. The prisoners have been held ever since in Rabat’s notorious Sale jail awaiting a military trial which has been rescheduled twice in the last two years. 
Regarded by some as the first spark of the Arab Spring, the Gdeim Izik camp was set up by thousands of Saharawis calling for an improvement in their living conditions and demanding the long-overdue, UN-backed right to a referendum on independence. Its destruction on 8th November 2010 resulted in dozens of deaths, imprisonments, injuries and forced disappearances.
Cathy Jamieson MP, Vice Chair of the All Party Parliament Group on Western Sahara said today:
For two years 23 Saharawis who were involved in the Gdeim Izik protesters have held in prison without trial. Numerous human rights organisations have expressed concerns over both their treatment and the fact that it is an abuse of process to try civilians in a military court. We call on the Moroccan authorities to release them without delay.
Javier Bardem, whose Sahara documentary, Sons of the Clouds, will have its UK premiere in London this Saturday said today:
This demonstration in London is part of an every growing international clamour for justice for the Saharawi imprisoned without trial in Moroccan jails, the Saharawi subjugated by unlawful occupation in Western Sahara and the Saharawi exiled for 37 years in desert refugee camps.

Javier Bardem supports jailed Western Sahara activists

Activists in London today took part in an international day of protest marking the second anniversary of the detention without trial of 23 Saharawis from Western Sahara.

They are demanding the immediate release of the prisoners who were arrested following the violent dismantling of the Gdeim Izik protest camp by Moroccan police in 2010. The prisoners have been held ever since in Rabat’s notorious Sale jail awaiting a military trial which has been rescheduled twice in the last two years. 

Regarded by some as the first spark of the Arab Spring, the Gdeim Izik camp was set up by thousands of Saharawis calling for an improvement in their living conditions and demanding the long-overdue, UN-backed right to a referendum on independence. Its destruction on 8th November 2010 resulted in dozens of deaths, imprisonments, injuries and forced disappearances.

Cathy Jamieson MP, Vice Chair of the All Party Parliament Group on Western Sahara said today:

For two years 23 Saharawis who were involved in the Gdeim Izik protesters have held in prison without trial. Numerous human rights organisations have expressed concerns over both their treatment and the fact that it is an abuse of process to try civilians in a military court. We call on the Moroccan authorities to release them without delay.

Javier Bardem, whose Sahara documentary, Sons of the Clouds, will have its UK premiere in London this Saturday said today:

This demonstration in London is part of an every growing international clamour for justice for the Saharawi imprisoned without trial in Moroccan jails, the Saharawi subjugated by unlawful occupation in Western Sahara and the Saharawi exiled for 37 years in desert refugee camps.